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Concussion Signs and Symptoms

Concussion signs (observable by others) and symptoms (experienced by the athlete) fall into five clusters: symptoms, physical signs, behavioral changes, cognitive impairments, and sleep difficulties. Symptom scales continue to be a critical component in concussion assessment.

SmartTeams™ Talk: Don’t Overprescribe Cognitive Rest After Concussion, Says Pieroth

Emerging science and expert consensus are challenging the notion that an extended period of complete cognitive and physical rest after concussion is necessary for recovery, and that concussed athletes need no more than 1-2 days rest at home, after which they should return to school with modifications to the school day as needed.

Consider Long-Term Effects of Concussion in Retirement Decision, Says Guskiewicz

Concussion expert, Kevin Guskiewicz, PhD, ATC, Kenan Distinguished Professor and Director of the Matthew Gfeller Sport-Related Traumatic Brain Injury Research Center at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, says that, while he hesitates to say that any specific number of concussions should prompt a decision to retire from contact or collision sports, it is important for athletes and their parents to consider the long-term effects of concussion, including depression and memory impairment.

Neuropsychologist: Important Member of Concussion Care Team

Sports concussion neuropsychologist Rosemarie Scolaro Moser, Ph. D., explains why a neuropsychologist is an important member of the concussion care team.

Concussion: Emotional Problems Can Result

A concussion can lead a concussed athlete to experience serious emotional problems. Parents and schools, says sports concussion neuropsychologist, Rosemarie Scolaro Moser, PhD, therefore need to watch for signs of depression, and be pro-active in providing support for emotional issues resulting from concussion.

Quitting Contact or Collision Sport After Concussion: Tough On Family, Not Just Athlete

Retiring from contact or collision sports due to concussion history can be emotionally difficult for both athlete and parent.  Athletes who  play other sports, have clear academic goals, high self-esteem, and supportive and responsible parents fare best.
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