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Dehydration - General

Saying Most Kids Aren't Dehydrated Not The Same As Saying Dehydration Not A Concern For Youth Athletes

It may be a myth that people need to drink 8 glasses of water a day, and that most kids are dehydrated, but, says a sports hydration expert, that isn't the same as saying dehydration isn't a concern for kids playing sports.

Sodium, Muscle Cramps and Sweat Loss: Tips for Sweaty Athletes

Over-hydration can be as dangerous to your health as dehydration. So what does a sweaty athlete need to know about staying adequately hydrated without stomach sloshing? Here are some tips.

Dehydration in Sports: A Year-Round Concern

Whether your tween or teen is at the rink, on the court, in the pool, or on the slopes, the need to keep them well-hydrated so they can perform at their best is the same in winter as on the hottest days of summer.

Dehydration Constant Concern Regardless of Weather

Contrary to conventional wisdom, a young athlete's need to stay hydrated is a constant regardless of the sports season, Kids can become dehydrated whatever and whenever they play sports, regardless of the temperature or relative humidity.

Cold Weather Sports: Recognizing and Preventing Dehydration, Hypothermia and Frostbite

Spending time outdoors is fun, even in the cold of winter. But, just as in warmer weather, special precautions need to be taken when exercising in cold weather to avoid dehydration, hypothermia, and frostbite. Here are some things to consider if you or your children are playing sports in the cold.

Tips for Exercising Safely in the Heat

With summer temperatures soaring, the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) has prepared a list of important tips that people of all ages can follow to enjoy physical activity and exercise and also reduce the risk of exertional heat illness that may occur from activity in the heat of summer. This is especially timely in July and August when young athletes are participating in summer and pre-season sports programs and back-to-school games are just around the corner.

Top Five Heat Illness and Hydration Myths About Children

MomsTeam hydration expert, Dr. Susan Yeargin, debunks five common heat illness and hydration myths about children exercising in the heat.

Three Dehydration Signs: Weight Loss, Dark Urine, Thirst

Weight loss, dark urine, and thirst (WUT)are the three main signs that a young athlete is dehydrated.


Dehydration At Summer Sports Camps Common, Studies Say

If your child is heading off to sports camp this summer, experts say that the chances are he or she will be dehydrated at camp.  According to studies at the University of Connecticut, between 50 and 75 percent of boys and girls attending summer sports camps are significantly dehydrated, with 25 to 30 percent of the campers studied showed signs of serious dehydration, putting them at increased risk of heat-related illnesses.

Dehydration: Signs and Symptoms

Dehydration can begin when an athlete loses as little as 1 percent of body weight. In a 70-pound child, that is less than 1 pound of weight lost through sweat. As little as a 2% decrease in body weight from fluid loss (e.g. 1.2 lb for a 60-lb athlete, 2.4 pounds for a 120-pound athlete) can lead to a significant decrease in muscular strength and stamina.





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