Texas Youth Football Program: Ten Ways It Is Walking The Talk On Safety

Participation in youth sports in general, and in youth football in particular, is on the decline in some parts of the nation.  One of the biggest factors driving the decline is a concern about injuries. 

Lots of youth sports programs say they want to improve safety, but how many are actually making the effort to implement best health and safety practices?

Lots of youth sports programs say they want to improve safety, but how many are actually making the effort to implement best health and safety practices? I can't speak for every program, but I know one that is definitely walking the talk: the youth tackle and flag football and cheer program in Grand Prairie, Texas, where I spent the first week of August educating and training kids, parents, coaches, and administrators on ways to make football safer as part of MomsTEAM Institute's SmartTeams| UNICEF International Safeguards of Children in Sports project.

Does Body Shaving Increase MRSA Risk?

Players who reported body shaving are 6.1 time more likely to develop MRSA infections. Shaving genitals or the groin was associated with a higher infection risk than shaving other body sites.

Preventing and Treating Common Skin Conditions Among Athletes

No matter the sport, athletes are prone to five dermatologic issues: blisters, turf burns, athlete's foot, acne mechanica and exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light. Here are some prevention and treatment tips from a dermatologist.

Safety Comes First, No Matter Sport or Season

The winter sports season is in full swing, and spring sports are a ways off, but safety comes first, no matter what the sport or the season. Here's a sixteen-point safety checklist to keep athletes in the game.

CHG-Medicated Soap Helps Prevent MRSA Spread: Study

Using soaps medicated with 4 percent chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) is more effective in preventing the spread of community-acquired methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) than non-medicated soaps, says a new study.

Risk of MRSA From Gym Surfaces May Be Exaggerated: Study

Community gym surfaces do not appear to be reservoirs for MRSA transmission, according to a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, suggesting that skin-to-skin contact, not skin-to-surface contact transmits the infection.

MRSA Skin Infections: Frequently Asked Questions

MRSA skin infections are hard to spot, often misdiagnosed as heat rash, razor burn, spider bites, ingrown hair or pimples.  Don't think MRSA skin infections are serious? Ask former wrestler, Chris Bettinski, who almost lost his leg - and his life- to MRSA.



MRSA Skin Infections Are Preventable

Of the estimated 715,000 high school sports-related injuries which are sustained by youth athletes each year, many, such as sprains, strains, fractures and concussions, are hard to prevent.  Some sports injuries, however, including bacterial skin infections like Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (CA-MRSA), impetigo and folliculitis, are preventable if athletes, coaches, and parents take certain precautions, including hand washing with antibacterial gel or wipes containing CHG.

Wash Hands To Prevent Spread of Skin Infections

"Hand hygiene is the single most important practice in reducing the transmission of infectious [diseases]," says a new position statement by the National Athletic Trainers' Association on preventing, recognizing and treating skin infections in athletics, including community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA). 

Skin Infections in Athletics: Preventing, Recognizing & Treating

Skin infections in athletes, including community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA), are extremely common.  The nature of athletics, which expose the skin to a wide variety of stresses, trauma, environmental factors, and infectious agents, all combine to continually attack the integrity of the skin and lead to considerable disruption to individual and team activities.  A new position statement by the National Athletic Trainers' Association, says that recognition of skin diseases is absolutely essential, particularly by certified athletic trainers, who "represent the first line of defense against spread of infections to other team members."
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