Polluted Air at Ice Rinks Is Dangerous to Athletes' Health

Attention hockey moms and dads: the air you and your children are breathing at the rink may be hazardous to your health. The culprit:  gas-, diesel- and propane-powered ice resurfacing machines which spew out a toxic stew of carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and particulate matter, all which can result in potentially serious short- and long-term health problems.

Managing Asthma in Sports

Asthma and exercise-induced asthma (EIA) among athletes are common, but athletic performance need not be hindered if your child takes an active role in controlling the condition and follows good practice and control measures.  Indeed, if your child has asthma, he or she should be encouraged  to exercise as a way to strengthen muscles, improve respiratory health, enhance endurance, and otherwise improve overall well-being. 




Playing Fields Near Busy Highways Pose Risks for Youth Athletes

Locating playing fields near busy highways pose serous risks to the developing lungs of young athletes. A substantial and growing body of scientific evidence has linked airborne toxic pollution from motor vehicles, trains and aircraft to significant health problems, especially in children, including aggravated asthma, chronic bronchitis, reduced lung function, irregular heartbeat, heart attack and premature death in people with heart or lung disease.

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