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K.C. Wilder (Performance Coach): Learned From Kids That No Such Thing As Failure In Sports

Being the mother of an athlete is a challenging yet rewarding role. So, in 2012, MomsTEAM designated May as Sports Moms Month and celebrated by asking some of our favorite sports moms to share their wisdom by responding to a series of questions.

Today, we hear from former professional cyclist, certified sports trainer, performance coach and sports mom, K.C. Wilder:

 MomsTEAM: Were you an athlete and what sports did you play as a youth (under 19)?

A former professional cyclist, certified sports trainer and performance consultant says the most important thing she has learned from her kidsis that there is no such thing as failure in youth sports.

Pennsylvania Softball Team and Umpire Selected as National Recipients of NFHS National High School Spirit of Sport Award

The New Kensington (Pennsylvania) Valley High School softball team and umpire Bill Dithrich have been selected the 2011 national recipients of the "National High School Spirit of Sport Award" by the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS): Dithrich for having the courage and intergrity to make a call that ended the softball team's undefeated season and the team for inviting him to be the keynote speaker at its post-season awards banquet to talk about a teachable moment about sports, ethics and life.

2010 Top Five Youth Sports Heroes Reflect Adults' Positive Impact

A 2010 Reuters News/Ipsos poll caused a stir by concluding that parents in the United States are the world's worst behaved parents at children's sports contests. Sixty percent of adults who attend kids' games have seen parents verbally or physically abuse coaches or officials, a higher percentage than in any of the 21 other nations polled.  Nationally-recognized youth sports expert and longtime coach, Douglas E. Abrams, believes the poll seriously distorts the state of youth sports in America.

Youth Sports Hero of the Month: Rebecca Wong (Chelmsford, Mass.)

On March 3, 2010, senior Rebecca Wong finished tenth in the Massachusetts state high school alpine skiing championships, the final medal position. Or so she and everyone else on the slopes thought. When Wong watched a film of her slalom run afterwards, she realized that she had missed a gate near the bottom of the course and should have been disqualified. Race officials had not seen the miss, and neither had any spectator. What happened next made Rebecca January's youth sports hero.

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