Top Three Nutrition Tips For Athletes

Sports nutritionist and MomsTeam expert Nancy Clark's top three nutrition tips for athletes: think of food as fuel; fuel by day, diet by night; and, think quality calories.


Sports Nutrition Must-Haves: Food and A Guidebook

What are sports nutrition "must-haves"? Peanut butter, low fat milk, oatmeal, nuts, and salmon, says Nancy Clark. And a copy of her Sports Nutrition Guidebook!

Eating Foods Rich in Omega 3's: Heart Healthy And May Protect Against Concussion

Eating foods rich in Omega 3's (DHA or fish oil), such as tunafish or salmon, twice a week, is good  because they heart-healthy and may protect the brain against concussion, says sports nutritionist Nancy Clark.

Complex Carbohydrates: Foundation of Athlete's Diet

Complex carbohydrates such as whole grains, pastas, oatmeal, are the foundation of any athlete's diet, says sports nutritionist Nancy Clark, because they are the fuel for exercise.

Fruits and Vegetables: Important Part of Athlete's Diet

Fruits and vegetables are "nature's vitamin pills," says sports nutritionist Nancy Clark, and should be an important part of every meal an athlete eats.

Nutritional Supplements: Not For Young Athletes, Says Sports Nutritionist Nancy Clark

Taking nutritional supplements such as creatine, says sports nutritionist Nancy Clark, puts young athletes at a disadvantage because if they start taking them early they will never know what their bodies can do without them. 

Well-Balanced Diet Can Eliminate Need for Nutritional Supplements

An athlete's nutritional needs can usually be met by eating a well-balanced diet, eliminating the need for supplements, says sports nutritionist Nancy Clark.

Athletes Should Monitor Hydration Status

Athletes should drink enough fluids that they need to urinate every 2 to 4 hours. A small volume of urine and/or a dark color are signs of dehydration, says sports nutritionist Nancy Clark.

Sports Nutrition: Think of Food as Fuel

All athletes regardless of the sport they play should think of food as fuel, says sports nutritionist Nancy Clark, fueling up before sports and refueling after, and, most of all, ensuring that they make time to eat.

Eating On A Timeline

Athletes should space meals out on a timeline approximately every four hours, starting with a bigger breakfast, and avoid an eating "crescendo" in which they consume most of their calories at dinner, says sports nutritionist Nancy Clark.
Syndicate content