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Preventing Volleyball Injuries

Parents and coaches can help prevent common volleyball injuries by promoting proper warm-up, stretching and strengthening exercises, as well as paying close attention to the proper techniques, footwear, braces and pads to play volleyball safely.

Lower Back Pain in Female Athletes Is Not Normal

As with ACL injuries, female athletes are more prone than their male counterparts to small, hairline fractures of the lower (lumbar) spine, usually from  overtraining (e.g. overuse injuries) or improper loading of the spine.  Because such injuries can be misdiagnosed, it is important for coaches and parents to recognize the symptoms and seek appropriate medical treatment.

Should I Be Ashamed For Feeling This Way About My Daughter's Sport Team?

If anyone who comes on this site has read anything I’ve written you should pretty much be aware that I’m on a one man crusade to stop coaches from abusing some kids through the practicing of benching, or essentially giving a player on the team either no, or very, very little, meaningful playing time.

Ankle Brace Reduces First-Time Sprains in High School Volleyball, Study Finds

Ankle sprains are the most common injury in high school volleyball, and the most common acute injury. A new study, however, suggests that volleyball players who wear ankle braces can reduce the risk of first-time ankle sprains, with rigid or semi-rigid braces more effective for girls.

Replacing Athletic Shoes Recommended Even If No Signs of Excessive Wear

Because the mid-sole material of an athletic shoe takes a pounding and eventually loses its ability to provide your child's foot with adequate support or cushioning, experts, such as Dr. Michael Lowe, past President of the American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine, and long time team podiatrist of the NBA's Utah Jazz, recommend periodic replacement of athletic shoes, even if the bottom sole shows no sign of excessive wear.

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