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Concussion Safety

Pediatrics Group's Position on Tackling in Youth Football Strikes Right Balance

Last month, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) endorsed efforts to limit contact practices in youth football, but declined to make a clear recommendation in favor of delaying the age at which tackling is introduced. The AAP likewise refused to support those calling for an outright ban on tackling in football for athletes below age 18, unwilling to recommend at this time such a fundamental change in the way the game is played.

As someone who has been working for 15 years to make youth football safer, MomsTEAM's Executive Director was glad to see the nation's largest and most prestigious pediatrics group support so many of the evidence- and expert consensus-based recommendations MomsTEAM has been making to improve the safety of the game.

Pediatrics Group Declines To Endorse Outright Ban On Tackle Football

The American Academy of Pediatrics today endorsed efforts to limit contact practices in youth football, but declined to make a clear recommendation in favor of delaying the age at which tackling is introduced, and likewise refused to support those calling for an outright ban on tackling in football for athletes below age 18,

Chronic Under-Reporting of Concussion Symptoms By Athletes Continues Despite Increased Education and Awareness

Chronic under-reporting of concussions among high school football players continues to be a problem, despite increased awareness, education and legislation, says new research.

Repetitive Head Impacts Damage The Brain: A 'No Brainer,' Purdue Researchers Find

Research by scientists at Purdue goes a long way to eliminating any remaining doubt that repetitive head impacts, such as sustained by players in American football, result in brain abnormalities and impaired neurocognitive functioning during a football season, and that those effects persist long after the season.

Texas Youth Football and Cheer Program: Ten Ways It Is Walking The Talk On Safety

Participation in youth sports in general, and in youth football in particular, is on the decline in some parts of the nation.  One of the biggest factors driving the decline is a concern about injuries. 

Lots of youth sports programs say they want to improve safety, but how many are actually making the effort to implement best health and safety practices?

Lots of youth sports programs say they want to improve safety, but how many are actually making the effort to implement best health and safety practices? I can't speak for every program, but I know one that is definitely walking the talk: the youth tackle and flag football and cheer program in Grand Prairie, Texas, where I spent the first week of August educating and training kids, parents, coaches, and administrators on ways to make football safer as part of MomsTEAM Institute's SmartTeams| UNICEF International Safeguards of Children in Sports project.

NFHS Recommendation To Limit Full-Contact Practices In High School Football Gains Traction

Recommendations by the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) designed to minimize the risk of concussions and head impact exposure in high school football, especially limits on full-contact practices, have been implemented by an increasing number of state associations.

Is A Child's Headache The Day After A Football Game Cause For Concern? You Be The Judge

 

"Mom, I still have a headache." If you are a mom of a teenager, you probably hear them say that every day for various reasons. Life is tough when you are 13- or 14-years-old. You study too much, or you watch too much TV, or play too many video games. You get dehydrated from sports or just stressed by peers and hormones. You get headaches. Who knows why? A headache isn't a big deal, right? So why on this Wednesday morning did my son's announcement send an icy shiver down my spine? That he plays his 8th grade football games on Tuesday nights, that's why!

When her son announces that he still had a headache after his football game the night before, a Texas mom springs into action. Did she do the right thing? You be the judge.

AFL Becomes First Professional Sports League to Require Helmet Impact Sensors

The Arena Football League (AFL), in partnership with Brain Sentry, has become the first professional sports league to require helmet-mounted impact sensors to alert sideline personnel to hits that may cause concussion.

NOCSAE Meeting: Lots Of Questions, But No Answers

Last Friday, I attended the summer meeting of the National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE) at the Boston Harbor Hotel. It was hard to be inside on such a spectacular summer day, but made easier by the location of the meeting: in the Atlantic Room, directly above Rowe's Wharf, with a view of a sparkling Boston harbor filled with sailboats and power boats. Boston harbor skyline with Rowes Warf

The summer meeting of the National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE) was held in a room overlooking Boston harbor, but the view was about the only thing that made it worth attending, says Brooke de Lench.

Football Concussion Return-To-Play Guidelines

A multidisciplinary sports medicine team at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta (CHA) has proposed sport-specific return-to-play guidelines after concussion for ten sports known to put young athletes at the highest risk of mild traumatic brain injury, including football.
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