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Effects of Concussion and Repetitive Head Impacts Including Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

Repetitive Head Impacts: A Major Concern At All Levels of Sports

Brain trauma among football players may be less the result of violent helmet-on-helmet collisions that cause concussions as the accumulation of sub-concussive blows.  The long-term effects of such repetitive brain trauma are still unknown.

Sports Concussion Research, CTE, and the Media: Can The Disconnect Ever Be Repaired?

The public's perception that a direct causal link exists between repetitive head contact and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is largely the result of one-sided, sensationalized, and biased reporting, argue four head injury researchers in a provocative editorial in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

Playing With Concussion Doubles Recovery Time For High School Athletes

High school athletes who continue to play with a sport-related concussion (SRC) take nearly twice as long to be cleared for a full return to sports than those who are immediately removed from play, finds a new study.

Repetitive Head Impacts Damage The Brain: A 'No Brainer,' Purdue Researchers Find

Research by scientists at Purdue goes a long way to eliminating any remaining doubt that repetitive head impacts, such as sustained by players in American football, result in brain abnormalities and impaired neurocognitive functioning during a football season, and that those effects persist long after the season.

Purdue Study First To Find Subtle Cognitive Deficits In High School Football Players From Repetitive Head Impacts

A 2010 study by researchers at Purdue University was the first to report that football players who displayed no clinically-observable signs of concussion, nevertheless showed measurable impairment of neurocognitive function (primarily visual working memory) on neurocognitive tests, as well as altered activation in neurophysiologic function on sophisticated brain imaging tests (fMRI).

Heading in Youth Soccer: The Debate Continues

A recent youth soccer safety campaign urging middle schools and under-14 soccer leagues to eliminate heading in the sport has sparked renewed interest in the controversial issue, but is also being criticized for advancing a slanted view of the science.

Concussions Lead To Microscopic Structural Changes In The Brain, Three New Studies Say

Concussions result in microscopic white matter and inflammatory changes to the brain, say three new studies published in the Journal of Neurosurgery. The studies add to a growing body of research suggesting that concussion can no longer be thought of as a transient injury resulting in a temporary disruption of brain function, but results in structural and electrophysiological changes which persist long after the injury occurs.

Microstructural Changes Detected In Hockey Players' Brains May Be Due To Concussive or Subconcussive Trauma

Using susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), researchers have identified microstructural changes in the brains of male and female college-level ice hockey players that could be due to concussive or subconcussive trauma.

Concussion Has Long Term Effect On Cognitive Function and Visual Processing, Studies Find

Sport-related concussion sustained in early life can have long-term implications for brain health and cognitive and sensory function, find two new studies. The findings add to a growing body of research on long-term deficits stemming from sport-related concussion, and suggest that concussive injuries can disrupt fundamental elements of higher-order neurocognition by chronically impairing attention, working memory, inhibition, and interference control, as well as lower-level sensory and perceptual processing.

History Of Concussion Linked To Increased Risk of Depression In Teens

A history of concussion is associated with more than a 3-fold increased risk of a current diagnosis of depression, even after controlling for age, sex, parental mental health, and socioeconomic status, finds a new study, which recommends that clinicians caring for youth with concussion be aware of this association and screen youth for symptoms of depression.
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