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Successful Parenting

Sometimes a Game Is Just That: A Game

My daughter and her friends are typical 7th graders. When they find a new activity they like, they dive in head first leaving all other activities behind in the splash. Doesn't matter if they also are involved with trumpet, violin, piano, biking, rock climbing, drama, cooking, ballet, fencing, or any other activity. Doesn't matter that they have homework and the need for some free time and family time. To this age group, a new activity is like falling in love - it becomes their be all, end all.

Even Bad Coaches Can Teach Your Child Life Lessons

Child psychologist Shari Kuchenbecker, Ph.D. talks about how parents can use poor coaches as negative role models to teach their child important life lessons.

The Role of Parents In Youth Sports

Sports psychologist Shari Kuchenbecker, Ph.D., talks about the important role of parents in helping their children learn life lessons through sports.

Teaching Your Children to Speak for Themselves

Child psychologist Shari Kuchenbecker, Ph.D., discusses the importance of teaching children to speak up for themselves in dealing with coaches and teammates rather than handling of all of their problems for them.

Teaching Your Child to Speak Up In Sports

Child psychologist Shari Kuchenbecker, Ph.D. discusses the importance for parents of teaching their children to speak up for themselves with coaches and teammates as an important way to build self-confidence.

Talking With A Child After a Poor Game or Performance

Shari Kuchenbecker, Ph.D., provides tips on how parents can  talk to a young athlete after he has performed poorly in a game or competition, and the importance of consoling the child, rather than putting him down.

Approaching Youth Sports Coaches When Parents Share Common Concerns

Child psychologist Shari Kuchenbecker, Ph.D., says that, in most circumstances, a parent's best course of action if she has a concern with her child's coach is to empower the young athlete to speak to the coach herself. When a number of parents on a team find that they share a common concern, however, it may be time to request that the coach hold a team meeting for players and parents. It is important that parents inform the coach in advance of the meeting of the general area of concern and that they emphasize that the goal is to find a positive solution that is best for all the children.

Approaching Youth Sports Coaches When Parents Share Common Concerns

Child psychologist Shari Kuchenbecker, Ph.D., says that, in most circumstances, a parent's best course of action if she has a concern with her child's coach is to empower the young athlete to speak to the coach herself. When a number of parents on a team find that they share a common concern, however, it may be time to request that the coach hold a team meeting for players and parents. It is important that paretns inform the coach in advance of the meeting of the general area of concern and that they emphasize that the goal is to find a positive solution that is best for all the children.

Talking To Youth Sports Coaches When Parents Share Common Concerns

Child psychologist Shari Kuchenbecker, Ph.D., says that when a number of parents on a team find that they share a common concern it may be time to request that the coach hold a team meeting for players and parents.

Okay to Fail

Got to know another single sports mom, Kim, at a conference in New York City last week. There is a sense of worlds crashing into each other when this happens – we were striking up a conversation about our mutual profession (teaching writing at college level) and ended up sharing anecdotes about kids’ elite sports.

Chasing Blue Ribbons

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