Sports Safety

Youth Sports: Abuse Takes Many Forms

Abuse in youth sports takes four basic forms: physical, emotional, sexual and neglect. Unfortunately, all forms of abuse are common and the damage from the most common form of abuse (emotional abuse) is no less real than the damage resulting from other forms of abuse.

Physical Abuse in Youth Sports Can Leave Emotional Scars

Studies have shown that among the many effects of physical abuse are depression, anxiety, cognitive and learning difficulties, even a lowering of IQ (especially verbal IQ), disordered sleep, flashbacks, loss of empathy, aggressive behavior, chronically high stress levels which can lead to chronic health effects such as high blood pressure and increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and inability to maintain relationships.

Concussion Bill of Rights #1: Mandatory Pre-Season Concussion Safety Meeting

Because one of the keys to keeping athletes safe when it comes to concussion is education, a concussion education and safety meeting should be held for parents and athletes should be held before every season. Ideally, the meeting should include presentations by medical doctors, former athletes, and parents of concussed current or former athletes.

Pre-Season Concussion Safety Meetings: Every Team Should Have One

With pre-season practices beginning around the country for fall sports such as football and soccer which have high concussion rates, it is important for parents and athletes to be on the same page as the coaches and medical staff on the subject of concussions. The best way is for the coach to hold a concussion education and safety meeting for parents and athletes before every season.

Using Intuition Key To Sports Parenting Success

Are you trying to decide whether and when to let your child start playing sports , try out for a competitive travel team or begin specializing in a single sport? Are you considering pulling your child off a team because you sense tjhat your child is at risk of emotional or sexual abuse by the coach? My advice is to trust your intuition.

Muscle and Joint Pain Relief

Brooke de Lench, athlete, author and founder of MomsTeam, talks about Boiron's Arnicare line.

Concussion Bill of Rights # 4: An Athletic Trainer Should Be On Staff

Among the things which increase the anxiety level of parents of children playing contact sports is the fact that many high school programs don't employ athletic trainers who have received training in recognizing the often subtle signs of a concussion. Only 42 percent of U.S. high schools, according to the National Athletic Trainers' Association, have access to an AT.* In some states, the number is much lower (Over three-quarters of Nebraska high schools, for instance, are without ATs).

Stretching, Warm Ups and Cool Downs Prevent Youth Sports Injuries

While not all youth sports injuries are preventable, sport specific strength and conditioning training and adequate rest between games go a long way in preventing both serious and minor injuries. The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) recommends that children and adolescents include fitness exercises during each training session to develop specific skills required for that sport. While fitness activities may be geared towards the strength, endurance and flexibility requirements of that sport, they should not exclude other components of a well-rounded general fitness program.

Conservative Management of Youth Concussions, More Education Needed, de Lench Says

In her keynote address to the 2nd Annual Sports Concussion Summit in Marina del Ray, California MomsTeam.com founder Brooke de Lench offered suggestions on how parents, coaches, officials, administrators, athletic trainers, clinician, current or former professional athlete, and sports safety equipment manufacturer, could work together as a team to protect the nation's children against the serious, life-altering consequences of concussions.

Female Athlete Triad

In 1992, the American College of Sports Medicine first recognized that girls and women in sports were particularly susceptible to three interrelated conditions – disordered eating, menstrual irregularity, and osteoporosis – that have come to be known as the "female athlete triad."

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