Sports Safety

Prevent Heat Illness By Empowering Parents, Expert Says

With fall sports beginning around the country, it is critically important for parents to be pro-active when it comes to preventing heat illness.  "Parents need to be empowered to question coaches," says Dr. Susan Yeargin.  "Coaches are often viewed as 'knowing best.' But that isn't always the case."

My Son’s Coach Is Making Him Wear Pads In 100 Degree Heat — What Can I Do?

I have really been feeling the heat lately, both literally and figuratively.

It began when I travelled to the steambath that was Williamsburg, Virginia last weekend to give two talks to over 1,000 parents of some of the most elite high school football players in the nation attending a four-day training camp, and the heat didn't let up when I returned to my office this week.

I have really been feeling the heat lately, both literally and figuratively. t began when I travelled to the steambath that was Williamsburg,
Virginia to give two talks to over 1,000 parents of some of
the most elite high school football players in the nation attending a
four-day training camp, and the heat didn't let up when I returned to my
office.

Kids, Sports, and Concussion: An Indispensible Resource For Parents and Coaches

Kids, Sports and Concussions sets the gold standard for books on sports-related concussions. It covers everything a sports parent and coach needs to know about concussions - and more, says MomsTeam founder and publisher, Brooke de Lench.

Concussion Safety Education Is Personal For MomsTeam Founder

MomsTeam Founder and Publisher, Brooke de Lench, talks about the difficult decision to pull a son with a history of multiple concussions and learning disabilities out of high school football and lacrosse, and says parents should have a right to expect when they entrust their children to a sports program that it will take reasonable precautions to protect them against harm. In other words, parents have a right to expect that the entire team to whom they entrust their children's safety — including the national governing body for the child's sport, the state association, the athletic or club director, the athletic trainer (if there is one), and especially the coaches - are part of the concussion solution, not part of the problem.

Ten Years After: The State of Youth Sports in 2010

In August 2010 MomsTeam.com celebrated its tenth anniversary.  As we head into 2011, MomsTeam.com founder and Publisher, Brooke de Lench, looks back at where youth sports were 10 years ago, where it is now, and where it is going.  She says it's a mixed bag: In some ways, things have gotten better, and some ways they have stayed the same, and in some ways they have gotten worse.

 

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Moms Speaking Up for Sports Safety Should Be Applauded, Not Dismissed

There is a battle brewing at Laguna Beach High School in California. It involves protecting the safety of kids during sports, so you know which side I fall on. This is no different than hundreds of stories from across the country that that I get sent each month, but this caught my attention because it talked about a Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) infection which is a potentially fatal bacterium that too few sports parents know much about.  Artifiical turf end zone

Sexual Abuse in Sport: The Problem No One Wants To Talk About

On July 12, UNICEF's Innocenti Research Center in Florence, Italy released an important report on violence against children in sport in industrialized countries, including the United States.

The report found a troubling lack of awareness of and education on child protection issues among youth sports coaches, parents, and other stakeholders. To combat the problem it recommends improvements in data collection and knowledge generation about violence to children in sport, development of structures and systems for eliminating and preventing such violence (including promotion of ethical guidelines and codes of conduct), and education, awareness-raising and training.

Article Exposes Flaws In Way American Youth Sports System Develops Talent

A piece by Michael Sokolove called "How a Soccer Star is Made" in the New York Times Magazine  is a must-read article for sports parents, not just for the fascinating glimpse it provides into the way a famous Dutch soccer club grooms athletes for pro careers but because it exposes serious flaws in the way the American youth sports system develops talent.

Reforming Youth Sports: One Mom's Wish List

While Mother's Day may have come and gone, I have a lot to be thankful for: my wonderful, healthy triplet sons of whom I am immensely proud. But, wearing my MomsTeam hat, I also have wishes for all the sports moms out there.  My first wish is that, instead of defining competition solely in terms of winning and losing, youth sports could also reflect a mother's belief that, while competition is healthy and necessary, a successful competition is one where all players do their best and respect their teammates, opponents, and the rules.

To Nineteen Athletes Dying Young

During the 2003 fall sports season, MomsTeam received numerous e-mails, phone calls and visits with news far exceeding our worst fears about the number of deaths in youth sports.
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