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Football (Tackle)

Aspen Institute Football Roundtable Was Valuable, But Changed Few Minds

Last Friday, I participated in a roundtable discussion in Washington, D.C. conducted by the Aspen Institute's Sports & Society program called "Playing Safety: The Future of Youth Football?" It was moderated by ESPN's Tom Farrey and, in the phrase made famous by the movie Casablanca, rounded up all the usual suspects on concussion safety and football, including MomsTEAM concussion expert emeritus Dr. Bob Cantu, USA Football Executive Director Scott Hallenbeck, and NFL Player Association President DeMaurice Smith, among other luminaries from the world of football and journalism. I was indeed honored to be asked to join those debating the future of the sport.

The Aspen Institute's discussion on the future of youth and high school football rounded up the usual suspects, both those advocating against tackle football before age 14 or abolishing the sport altogether, and those saying that the best approach is to institute reforms so that teams can play smart, not scared.

MomsTeam's de Lench Joins Aspen Institute Roundtable On Future of Youth Football

MomsTEAM Founder and Publisher, Brooke de Lench, will be participating in an Aspen Institute roundtable discussion on the future of youth and high school football in the United States on Friday, November 9, 2012 from 11:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in Washington, D.C.

When A Player Is Hurt, Every Mom Feels Their Pain


The hit was clean. The defensive end came off the line quickly and got around two offensive blockers. He met the running back in the backfield and they crashed together to the turf. The fans cheering the offense fell silent. The defense had held, forcing a fourth down. Time to call, in the words of the announcer, a "$10.00 cab ride" for the offense.

The play was over, but the defensive end and the running back were still down.  It was a scene no fan wants to see.  Even if your child isn't the one injured, a sobering thought runs through your mind anyway: that it could have been.

The play was over, but the defensive end and the running back were still down. It was a scene no fan wants to see. Even if your child isn't the one injured, a sobering thought runs through your mind anyway: that it could be.

Football Mom 2.0

 

The conversion is complete! What a difference a year can make! This time last year, I was a timid novice. I was new to the world of elementary school 11-man tackle football. As a mom, I wanted to learn quickly, so I could help my son and myself! I channeled the truly great one, Olivia Manning! She is a football mom with no peers! With two sons in the NFL, she has seen it all! Every day and every situation, I would ask myself, "What would Olivia do ?" She served me well. We had a very successful first year in the league.

With her son in his second year playing football, a Texas mom has taken her game to a whole new level, but because she loves football and her son, it was easier than she thought to "graduate."

Neck Strengthening: Reducing Concussion Risk In Football

While there are no exercises to treat a concussion, exercises to strengthen the neck muscles and maintain or improve posture can help reduce the risk of injury. Even if the risk reduction is small, it's still worth the effort.

Buyer Beware (Part Two): NFHS Has NOT Endorsed Use of Football Helmet Covers As Reducing Concussion Risk

In recent weeks I have written a number of blogs about claims by equipment manufacturers that their products prevent or reduce the risk of concussions.  

First, it was to call attention to a settlement between the Federal Trade Commission and Brain Pad, a mouth guard manufacturer, barring the company from claiming that its mouthguard reduced the risk of concussion.

Next, it was to deconstruct some carefully-worded claims in a press release by a company named Unequal Technologies touting supplemental helmet protective pads utilizing so-called CRT (concussion reduction technology).

Beware of claims that external football helmet pads, now permitted in high school football, actually prevent or reduce the risk of concussion, says MomsTEAM founder, Brooke de Lench.

MomsTEAM Celebrates 12th Anniversary with Summer of Football (Part One)

Today is MomsTEAM's twelfth anniversary! It was on this day in 2000 that our website went live.

On our anniversary in years past I have blogged about what happened in the previous 12 months in youth sports, but this year the focus will be on youth football.

Why the narrower focus? Well, for two big reasons.

This has been the summer of football for MomsTEAM for two big reasons: first, we have been working on an exciting concussion project focusing on a football program in Oklahoma, and second, we have just returned from a visit to the Mecca of football: the New York City headquarters of the National Football League.

Parents Rethinking Contact Sports

Local youth football organizers in Minnesota say they are experiencing a 20 percent decline in registrations this year, citing increased awareness of the potential of serious injury and parents who are apparently picking other sports for their 3rd and 4th grade children.

Futbol Versus Football: Who's Got The True Super Fans?

A visit to Spain during soccer season leads a mom from football-crazy Texas to wonder whether, if football is a religion in the Longhorn State, is futball even more for FC Barcelona  and Real Madrid fans?

Heads Up: Recent Developments in Sports Safety

Three hot topics are on my mind today: wearable technology, head impact sensors, and football helmets.

Wearable technology

During the past year, I have been invited many times to participate in conversations about wearable technology for athletes. With our headquarters close to the hotbeds of technology centers of MIT and Harvard, I am often asked to sit in on meetings to provide my insight.

What I know is that this is a rapidly-developing field in which we are going to see some amazing technological advances in the next decade.

Three hot topics are on my mind today: wearable technology, head impact sensors, and football helmets.
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